How do I compress Java objects?

This example demonstrates how to compress a Java object. We compress the Java object using GZIPOutputStream, pass it to ObjectOutputStream to write the object into an external file. The object we are going to compress will be represented by the User object. We need to make the User object serializable so it must implements the java.io.Serializable interface. You can see the complete code snippet below.

package org.kodejava.example.zip;

import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileOutputStream;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.ObjectOutputStream;
import java.util.zip.GZIPOutputStream;

public class ZipObjectDemo {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        User admin = new User();
        admin.setId(1L);
        admin.setUsername("admin");
        admin.setPassword("secret");
        admin.setFirstName("System");
        admin.setLastName("Administrator");

        User foo = new User();
        foo.setId(2L);
        foo.setUsername("foo");
        foo.setPassword("secret");
        foo.setFirstName("Foo");
        foo.setLastName("Bar");

        System.out.println("Zipping....");
        System.out.println(admin);
        System.out.println(foo);

        File file = new File("user.dat");
        try (FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream(file);
             GZIPOutputStream gos = new GZIPOutputStream(fos);
             ObjectOutputStream oos = new ObjectOutputStream(gos)) {

            oos.writeObject(admin);
            oos.writeObject(foo);
            oos.flush();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}
package org.kodejava.example.zip;

import java.io.Serializable;

public class User implements Serializable {
    private Long id;
    private String username;
    private String password;
    private String firstName;
    private String lastName;

    public User() {
    }

    public Long getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public void setId(Long id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    public String getUsername() {
        return username;
    }

    public void setUsername(String username) {
        this.username = username;
    }

    public String getPassword() {
        return password;
    }

    public void setPassword(String password) {
        this.password = password;
    }

    public String getFirstName() {
        return firstName;
    }

    public void setFirstName(String firstName) {
        this.firstName = firstName;
    }

    public String getLastName() {
        return lastName;
    }

    public void setLastName(String lastName) {
        this.lastName = lastName;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "User{" +
                "id=" + id +
                ", username='" + username + '\'' +
                ", password='" + password + '\'' +
                ", firstName='" + firstName + '\'' +
                ", lastName='" + lastName + '\'' +
                '}';
    }
}

Running the code snippet will give us the following output:

Zipping....
User{id=1, username='admin', password='secret', firstName='System', lastName='Administrator'}
User{id=2, username='foo', password='secret', firstName='Foo', lastName='Bar'}

How do I create a client-server socket communication?

In this example you’ll see how to create a client-server socket communication. The example below consist of two main classes, the ServerSocketExample and the ClientSocketExample. The server application listen to port 7777 at the localhost. When we send a message from the client application the server receive the message and send a reply to the client application.

The communication in this example using the TCP socket, it means that there is a fixed connection line between the client application and the server application.

package org.kodejava.example.network;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.ObjectInputStream;
import java.io.ObjectOutputStream;
import java.lang.ClassNotFoundException;
import java.lang.Runnable;
import java.lang.Thread;
import java.net.ServerSocket;
import java.net.Socket;

public class ServerSocketExample {
    private ServerSocket server;
    private static final int PORT = 7777;

    private ServerSocketExample() {
        try {
            server = new ServerSocket(PORT);
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ServerSocketExample example = new ServerSocketExample();
        example.handleConnection();
    }

    private void handleConnection() {
        System.out.println("Waiting for client message...");

        // The server do a loop here to accept all connection initiated by the
        // client application.
        while (true) {
            try {
                Socket socket = server.accept();
                new ConnectionHandler(socket);
            } catch (IOException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }
}

class ConnectionHandler implements Runnable {
    private Socket socket;

    ConnectionHandler(Socket socket) {
        this.socket = socket;

        Thread t = new Thread(this);
        t.start();
    }

    public void run() {
        try {
            // Read a message sent by client application
            ObjectInputStream ois = new ObjectInputStream(socket.getInputStream());
            String message = (String) ois.readObject();
            System.out.println("Message Received: " + message);

            // Send a response information to the client application
            ObjectOutputStream oos = new ObjectOutputStream(socket.getOutputStream());
            oos.writeObject("Hi...");

            ois.close();
            oos.close();
            socket.close();

            System.out.println("Waiting for client message...");
        } catch (IOException | ClassNotFoundException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}
package org.kodejava.example.network;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.ObjectInputStream;
import java.io.ObjectOutputStream;
import java.lang.ClassNotFoundException;
import java.net.InetAddress;
import java.net.Socket;

public class ClientSocketExample {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        try {
            // Create a connection to the server socket on the server application
            InetAddress host = InetAddress.getLocalHost();
            Socket socket = new Socket(host.getHostName(), 7777);

            // Send a message to the client application
            ObjectOutputStream oos = new ObjectOutputStream(socket.getOutputStream());
            oos.writeObject("Hello There...");

            // Read and display the response message sent by server application
            ObjectInputStream ois = new ObjectInputStream(socket.getInputStream());
            String message = (String) ois.readObject();
            System.out.println("Message: " + message);

            ois.close();
            oos.close();
        } catch (IOException | ClassNotFoundException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

To test the application you need to start the server application. Each time you run the client application it will send a message “Hello There…” and in turns the server reply with a message “Hi…”.

How do I store objects in file?

This example demonstrates how to use the java.io.ObjectOutputStream and java.io.ObjectInputStream classes to write and read a serialized object. We will create a Book that implements java.io.Serializable interface. The Book class has a constructor that accept all the book detail information.

To write an object to a stream we call the writeObject() method of the ObjectOutputStream class and pass the serialized object to it. To read the object back we call the readObject() method of the ObjectInputStream class.

package org.kodejava.example.io;

import java.io.FileInputStream;
import java.io.FileOutputStream;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.ObjectInputStream;
import java.io.ObjectOutputStream;
import java.io.Serializable;

public class ObjectStoreExample {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // Create instances of FileOutputStream and ObjectOutputStream.
        try (FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream("books.dat");
             ObjectOutputStream oos = new ObjectOutputStream(fos)) {

            // Create a Book instance. This book object then will be stored in
            // the file.
            Book book = new Book("0-07-222565-3", "Hacking Exposed J2EE & Java",
                "Art Taylor, Brian Buege, Randy Layman");

            // By using writeObject() method of the ObjectOutputStream we can
            // make the book object persistent on the books.dat file.
            oos.writeObject(book);
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

        // We have the book saved. Now it is time to read it back and display
        // its detail information.
        try (FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream("books.dat");
             ObjectInputStream ois = new ObjectInputStream(fis)) {

            // To read the Book object use the ObjectInputStream.readObject() method.
            // This method return Object type data so we need to cast it back the its
            // origin class, the Book class.
            Book book = (Book) ois.readObject();
            System.out.println(book.toString());

        } catch (IOException | ClassNotFoundException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

// The book object will be saved using ObjectOutputStream class and to be read
// back using ObjectInputStream class. To enable an object to be written to a
// stream we need to make the class implements the Serializable interface.
class Book implements Serializable {
    private String isbn;
    private String title;
    private String author;

    public Book(String isbn, String title, String author) {
        this.isbn = isbn;
        this.title = title;
        this.author = author;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "Book{" +
            "isbn='" + isbn + '\'' +
            ", title='" + title + '\'' +
            ", author='" + author + '\'' +
            '}';
    }
}

The result of the code snippet above is:

Book{isbn='0-07-222565-3', title='Hacking Exposed J2EE & Java', author='Art Taylor, Brian Buege, Randy Layman'}