How do I write JSON string using JSON-Java (org.json) library?

The following code snippet show you how to create JSON string using JSON-Java library. Create an instance of JSONObject and use the put() method to create a key-value pair for the JSON string. The JSONArray object can be used to create an array of list of values to the JSON string, we also use the put() method to add value to the list.

The JSONObject.toString() method accept parameter called indentFactor, this set the indentation level of the generated string, which also make the JSON string generated easier to read and look prettier.

package org.kodejava.example.json;

import org.json.JSONArray;
import org.json.JSONObject;

public class WriteJSONString {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        JSONObject object = new JSONObject();
        object.put("id", 1L);
        object.put("name", "Alice");
        object.put("age", 20);

        JSONArray courses = new JSONArray();
        courses.put("Engineering");
        courses.put("Finance");
        courses.put("Chemistry");

        object.put("courses", courses);

        String jsonString = object.toString(2);
        System.out.println(jsonString);
    }
}

The result of the code snippet above is:

{
  "courses": [
    "Engineering",
    "Finance",
    "Chemistry"
  ],
  "name": "Alice",
  "id": 1,
  "age": 20
}

Maven Dependencies

<!-- https://repo1.maven.org/maven2/org/json/json/20180813/json-20180813.jar -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>org.json</groupId>
    <artifactId>json</artifactId>
    <version>20180813</version>
</dependency>

How do I read JSON file using JSON-Java (org.json) library?

In this example we are going to use the JSON-Java (org.json) library to read or parse JSON file. First we start by getting the InputStream of the JSON file to be read using getResourceAsStream() method. Next we construct a JSONTokener from the input stream and create an instance of JSONObject to read the JSON entries.

We can use method like getString(), getInt(), getLong(), etc to read a key-value from the JSON file. The getJSONArray() method allow us to read an list of values returned in JSONArray object. Which can be iterated to get each values represented by the key. Let’s see the detail code snippet below.

package org.kodejava.example.json;

import org.json.JSONArray;
import org.json.JSONObject;
import org.json.JSONTokener;

import java.io.InputStream;

public class ReadJSONString {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // info.json
        // {
        //  "id": "1",
        //  "name": "Alice",
        //  "age": "20",
        //  "courses": [
        //    "Engineering",
        //    "Finance",
        //    "Chemistry"
        //  ]
        //}
        String resourceName = "/info.json";
        InputStream is = ReadJSONString.class.getResourceAsStream(resourceName);
        if (is == null) {
            throw new NullPointerException("Cannot find resource file " + resourceName);
        }

        JSONTokener tokener = new JSONTokener(is);
        JSONObject object = new JSONObject(tokener);
        System.out.println("Id  : " + object.getLong("id"));
        System.out.println("Name: " + object.getString("name"));
        System.out.println("Age : " + object.getInt("age"));

        System.out.println("Courses: ");
        JSONArray courses = object.getJSONArray("courses");
        for (int i = 0; i < courses.length(); i++) {
            System.out.println("  - " + courses.get(i));
        }
    }
}

The result of the code snippet above is:

Id  : 1
Name: Alice
Age : 20
Courses: 
  - Engineering
  - Finance
  - Chemistry

Maven Dependencies

<!-- https://repo1.maven.org/maven2/org/json/json/20180813/json-20180813.jar -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>org.json</groupId>
    <artifactId>json</artifactId>
    <version>20180813</version>
</dependency>

How to pretty print JSON string using Jackson?

The following example demonstrates how to pretty print the JSON string produces by Jackson library. To produce well formatted JSON string we create the ObjectMapper instance and enable the SerializationFeature.INDENT_OUTPUT feature. To enable this feature we need to call the enable() method of the ObjectMapper and provide the feature to be enabled.

ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper().enable(SerializationFeature.INDENT_OUTPUT);
String json = mapper.writeValueAsString(recording);
System.out.println(json);

On the second example below we format unformatted JSON string. To do this we use the ObjectMapper‘s readValue(String, Class<T>) method which accept the JSON string and Object.class as the value type. The readValue() method return an Object. To format the JSON object we call mapper.writerWithDefaultPrettyPrinter().writeValueAsString(Object). This will produce a pretty formatted JSON.

ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
Object jsonObject = mapper.readValue(json, Object.class);
String prettyJson = mapper.writerWithDefaultPrettyPrinter().writeValueAsString(jsonObject);
System.out.println(prettyJson);

Below is the complete code snippets.

package org.kodejava.example.jackson;

import com.fasterxml.jackson.core.JsonProcessingException;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.ObjectMapper;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.SerializationFeature;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.time.LocalDate;
import java.time.Month;

public class JsonIndentOutput {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        JsonIndentOutput.formatObjectToJsonString();
        JsonIndentOutput.formatJsonString();
    }

    private static void formatObjectToJsonString() {
        Recording recording = new Recording();
        recording.setId(1L);
        recording.setTitle("Yellow Submarine");
        recording.setReleaseDate(LocalDate.of(1969, Month.JANUARY, 17));
        recording.setArtist(new Artist(1L, "The Beatles"));
        recording.setLabel(new Label(1L, "Apple"));

        ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper().enable(SerializationFeature.INDENT_OUTPUT);
        try {
            String json = mapper.writeValueAsString(recording);
            System.out.println(json);
        } catch (JsonProcessingException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    private static void formatJsonString() {
        String json = "{\"id\":1,\"title\":\"Yellow Submarine\",\"releaseDate\":\"1969-01-17\",\"artist\":{\"id\":1,\"name\":\"The Beatles\"},\"label\":{\"id\":1,\"name\":\"Apple\"}}";
        ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
        try {
            Object jsonObject = mapper.readValue(json, Object.class);
            String prettyJson = mapper.writerWithDefaultPrettyPrinter().writeValueAsString(jsonObject);
            System.out.println(prettyJson);
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

The code snippet above will pretty print the following JSON string:

{
  "id" : 1,
  "title" : "Yellow Submarine",
  "releaseDate" : "1969-01-17",
  "artist" : {
    "id" : 1,
    "name" : "The Beatles"
  },
  "label" : {
    "id" : 1,
    "name" : "Apple"
  }
}

Here are the structure of Recording class.

package org.kodejava.example.jackson;

import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.annotation.JsonDeserialize;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.annotation.JsonSerialize;

import java.time.LocalDate;
import java.util.Objects;

public class Recording {
    private Long id;
    private String title;

    @JsonDeserialize(using = LocalDateDeserializer.class)
    @JsonSerialize(using = LocalDateSerializer.class)
    private LocalDate releaseDate;

    private Artist artist;
    private Label label;

    public Recording() {
    }

    public Recording(Long id, String title, LocalDate releaseDate) {
        this.id = id;
        this.title = title;
        this.releaseDate = releaseDate;
    }

    // Getters and Setters
}

Maven Dependencies

<!-- http://repo1.maven.org/maven2/com/fasterxml/jackson/core/jackson-databind/2.8.6/jackson-databind-2.8.6.jar -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>com.fasterxml.jackson.core</groupId>
    <artifactId>jackson-databind</artifactId>
    <version>2.8.6</version>
</dependency>

How to format LocalDate object using Jackson?

We have a Recording class which has a Java 8 java.time.LocalDate property. We need to deserialize and serialize this property from and to JSON string. To do this we can use the @JsonDeserialize and @JsonSerialize annotations to annotate the LocalDate property of the Recording class.

@JsonDeserialize(using = LocalDateDeserializer.class)
@JsonSerialize(using = LocalDateSerializer.class)
private LocalDate releaseDate;

To use the annotation we need to create a class to deserialize and serialize the value. To create a deserializer class we create a class that extends StdDeserializer. The serializer class extends the StdSerializer class. Below is the definition of the LocalDateSerializer and LocalDateDeserializer class.

package org.kodejava.example.jackson;

import com.fasterxml.jackson.core.JsonGenerator;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.SerializerProvider;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.ser.std.StdSerializer;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.time.LocalDate;
import java.time.format.DateTimeFormatter;

public class LocalDateSerializer extends StdSerializer<LocalDate> {

    public LocalDateSerializer() {
        super(LocalDate.class);
    }

    @Override
    public void serialize(LocalDate value, JsonGenerator generator, SerializerProvider provider) throws IOException {
        generator.writeString(value.format(DateTimeFormatter.ISO_LOCAL_DATE));
    }
}
package org.kodejava.example.jackson;

import com.fasterxml.jackson.core.JsonParser;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.DeserializationContext;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.deser.std.StdDeserializer;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.time.LocalDate;

public class LocalDateDeserializer extends StdDeserializer<LocalDate> {

    protected LocalDateDeserializer() {
        super(LocalDate.class);
    }

    @Override
    public LocalDate deserialize(JsonParser parser, DeserializationContext context) throws IOException {
        return LocalDate.parse(parser.readValueAs(String.class));
    }
}

And here is the complete definition of the Recording class.

package org.kodejava.example.jackson;

import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.annotation.JsonDeserialize;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.annotation.JsonSerialize;

import java.time.LocalDate;
import java.util.Objects;

public class Recording {
    private Long id;
    private String title;

    @JsonDeserialize(using = LocalDateDeserializer.class)
    @JsonSerialize(using = LocalDateSerializer.class)
    private LocalDate releaseDate;

    private Artist artist;
    private Label label;

    public Recording() {
    }

    public Recording(Long id, String title, LocalDate releaseDate) {
        this.id = id;
        this.title = title;
        this.releaseDate = releaseDate;
    }

    // Getters and Setters
}

Maven Dependencies

<!-- http://repo1.maven.org/maven2/com/fasterxml/jackson/core/jackson-databind/2.8.6/jackson-databind-2.8.6.jar -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>com.fasterxml.jackson.core</groupId>
    <artifactId>jackson-databind</artifactId>
    <version>2.8.6</version>
</dependency>

How to read and write Java object to JSON file?

The following example demonstrate how to serialize and deserialize Java object to JSON file. The Jackson’s ObjectMapper class provides writeValue(File, Object) and readValue(File, Class<T>) methods which allow us to write an object into JSON file and read JSON file into an object respectively.

package org.kodejava.example.jackson;

import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.ObjectMapper;

import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;

public class ObjectToJsonFile {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Artist artist = new Artist();
        artist.setId(1L);
        artist.setName("The Beatles");

        ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();

        File file = new File("artist.json");
        try {
            // Serialize Java object info JSON file.
            mapper.writeValue(file, artist);
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

        try {
            // Deserialize JSON file into Java object.
            Artist newArtist = mapper.readValue(file, Artist.class);
            System.out.println("newArtist.getId() = " + newArtist.getId());
            System.out.println("newArtist.getName() = " + newArtist.getName());
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

The result of the code snippet are:

newArtist.getId() = 1
newArtist.getName() = The Beatles

Maven Dependencies

<!-- http://repo1.maven.org/maven2/com/fasterxml/jackson/core/jackson-databind/2.8.6/jackson-databind-2.8.6.jar -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>com.fasterxml.jackson.core</groupId>
    <artifactId>jackson-databind</artifactId>
    <version>2.8.6</version>
</dependency>

How to convert JSON string to Java object?

In the following example we will convert JSON string to Java object using ObjectMapper class from the Jackson library. This class provides a method readValue(String, Class<T>) which will deserialize a JSON string into Java object. The first argument to the method is the JSON string and the second parameter is the result type of the conversion.

package org.kodejava.example.jackson;

import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.ObjectMapper;

import java.io.IOException;

public class JsonToObject {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String json = "{\"id\": 1, \"name\": \"The Beatles\"}";

        ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
        try {
            Artist artist = mapper.readValue(json, Artist.class);
            System.out.println("Artist = " + artist);

            System.out.println("artist.getId() = " + artist.getId());
            System.out.println("artist.getName() = " + artist.getName());
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

The code snippet above will print to following output:

Artist = Artist{id=1, name='The Beatles'}
artist.getId() = 1
artist.getName() = The Beatles

Maven Dependencies

<!-- http://repo1.maven.org/maven2/com/fasterxml/jackson/core/jackson-databind/2.8.6/jackson-databind-2.8.6.jar -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>com.fasterxml.jackson.core</groupId>
    <artifactId>jackson-databind</artifactId>
    <version>2.8.6</version>
</dependency>

How to convert Java object to JSON string?

The following example shows how to convert Java object into JSON string using Jackson. Jackson provide ObjectMapper class provides functionality to read and write JSON data. The writeValueAsString(Object) method to serialize any Java object into string.

package org.kodejava.example.jackson;

import com.fasterxml.jackson.core.JsonProcessingException;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.ObjectMapper;

public class ObjectToJson {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Artist artist = new Artist();
        artist.setId(1L);
        artist.setName("The Beatles");

        ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
        try {
            String json = mapper.writeValueAsString(artist);
            System.out.println("JSON = " + json);
        } catch (JsonProcessingException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

Running the code snippet above will print out the following result:

JSON = {"id":1,"name":"The Beatles"}

The structure of Artist class.

package org.kodejava.example.jackson;

public class Artist {
    private Long id;
    private String name;

    public Artist() {
    }

    public Artist(Long id, String name) {
        this.id = id;
        this.name = name;
    }

    // Getters & Setters
}

Maven Dependencies

<!-- http://repo1.maven.org/maven2/com/fasterxml/jackson/core/jackson-core/2.8.6/jackson-core-2.8.6.jar -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>com.fasterxml.jackson.core</groupId>
    <artifactId>jackson-core</artifactId>
    <version>2.8.6</version>
</dependency>
<!-- http://repo1.maven.org/maven2/com/fasterxml/jackson/core/jackson-annotations/2.8.6/jackson-annotations-2.8.6.jar -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>com.fasterxml.jackson.core</groupId>
    <artifactId>jackson-annotations</artifactId>
    <version>2.8.6</version>
</dependency>
<!-- http://repo1.maven.org/maven2/com/fasterxml/jackson/core/jackson-databind/2.8.6/jackson-databind-2.8.6.jar -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>com.fasterxml.jackson.core</groupId>
    <artifactId>jackson-databind</artifactId>
    <version>2.8.6</version>
</dependency>

How do I do multipart upload using HttpClient?

This example demonstrates how to do multipart upload using the Apache HttpClient library. In this example we upload a single file. We start by creating an object of the file to be uploaded. The FileBody represent the binary body part of the file.

Next, prepare the HttpEntity object by create an instance of MultipartEntityBuilder. Add parts to this object, in this case we add the fileBody. We can add multiple part to this object as the name says. It can be string, file, etc as we do in a normal web form.

The build() method of the builder object finalize the entity creation and return us the HttpEntity object. To send / upload to server we create an HttpPost request and set the entity to be posted. Finally the execute() method of the HttpClient object send the multipart object to server.

package org.kodejava.example.httpclient;

import org.apache.http.HttpEntity;
import org.apache.http.client.HttpClient;
import org.apache.http.client.methods.HttpPost;
import org.apache.http.entity.ContentType;
import org.apache.http.entity.mime.HttpMultipartMode;
import org.apache.http.entity.mime.MultipartEntityBuilder;
import org.apache.http.entity.mime.content.FileBody;
import org.apache.http.impl.client.HttpClientBuilder;

import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;

public class HttpPostMultipartExample {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        File file = new File("data.zip");
        FileBody fileBody = new FileBody(file, ContentType.DEFAULT_BINARY);

        MultipartEntityBuilder builder = MultipartEntityBuilder.create();
        builder.setMode(HttpMultipartMode.BROWSER_COMPATIBLE);
        builder.addPart("file", fileBody);
        HttpEntity entity = builder.build();

        HttpPost request = new HttpPost("http://localhost:8080/upload");
        request.setEntity(entity);

        HttpClient client = HttpClientBuilder.create().build();
        try {
            client.execute(request);
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

To receive the file on the server you can take a look at the servlet code in the following example: How do I create a web based file upload?.

Maven Dependencies

<!-- http://repo1.maven.org/maven2/org/apache/httpcomponents/httpclient/4.5.3/httpclient-4.5.3.jar -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>org.apache.httpcomponents</groupId>
    <artifactId>httpclient</artifactId>
    <version>4.5.3</version>
</dependency>
<!-- http://repo1.maven.org/maven2/org/apache/httpcomponents/httpmime/4.5.3/httpmime-4.5.3.jar -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>org.apache.httpcomponents</groupId>
    <artifactId>httpmime</artifactId>
    <version>4.5.3</version>
</dependency>

How do I send POST request with a JSON body using the HttpClient?

The following code snippet show you how to send POST request with a JSON body using HttpClient. The payload in this example is a user information containing id, first_name and a last_name. We placed the payload in an object called StringEntity and also set its content type to ContentType.APPLICATION_FORM_URLENCODED.

On the other end called by this post request, data can be read for instance in a Java Servlet using the HttpServletRequest.getParameter() method. For example to read the JSON body send below we can call request.getParameter("data"). Which will give us the payload send using the HttpClient Post request.

Let’s jump into the code snippet below:

package org.kodejava.example.httpclient;

import org.apache.http.HttpResponse;
import org.apache.http.client.HttpClient;
import org.apache.http.client.methods.HttpPost;
import org.apache.http.entity.ContentType;
import org.apache.http.entity.StringEntity;
import org.apache.http.impl.client.HttpClientBuilder;

public class HttpPostJsonExample {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        String payload = "data={" +
                "\"username\": \"admin\", " +
                "\"first_name\": \"System\", " +
                "\"last_name\": \"Administrator\"" +
                "}";
        StringEntity entity = new StringEntity(payload,
                ContentType.APPLICATION_FORM_URLENCODED);

        HttpClient httpClient = HttpClientBuilder.create().build();
        HttpPost request = new HttpPost("http://localhost:8080/register");
        request.setEntity(entity);

        HttpResponse response = httpClient.execute(request);
        System.out.println(response.getStatusLine().getStatusCode());
    }
}

Maven Dependencies

<!-- http://repo1.maven.org/maven2/org/apache/httpcomponents/httpclient/4.5.3/httpclient-4.5.3.jar -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>org.apache.httpcomponents</groupId>
    <artifactId>httpclient</artifactId>
    <version>4.5.3</version>
</dependency>

How do I sort file names by their extension?

To sort file names by their extension we can use the ExtensionFileComparator class from the Apache Commons IO library. This class provide a couple instances of comparator such as:

Comparator Description
EXTENSION_COMPARATOR Case sensitive extension comparator
EXTENSION_REVERSE Reverse case sensitive extension comparator
EXTENSION_INSENSITIVE_COMPARATOR Case insensitive extension comparator
EXTENSION_INSENSITIVE_REVERSE Reverse case insensitive extension comparator
EXTENSION_SYSTEM_COMPARATOR System sensitive extension comparator
EXTENSION_SYSTEM_REVERSE Reverse system sensitive path comparator

The following snippet show you how to use the first two comparators listed above.

package org.kodejava.example.commons.io;

import org.apache.commons.io.FilenameUtils;
import static org.apache.commons.io.comparator.ExtensionFileComparator.*;

import java.io.File;
import java.util.Arrays;

public class FileSortByExtension {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        File file = new File(".");

        // Excludes directory in the list
        File[] files = file.listFiles(File::isFile);

        if (files != null) {
            // Sort in ascending order.
            Arrays.sort(files, EXTENSION_COMPARATOR);
            FileSortByExtension.displayFileOrder(files);

            // Sort in descending order.
            Arrays.sort(files, EXTENSION_REVERSE);
            FileSortByExtension.displayFileOrder(files);
        }
    }

    private static void displayFileOrder(File[] files) {
        System.out.printf("%-20s | %s%n", "Name", "Ext");
        System.out.println("--------------------------------");
        for (File file : files) {
            System.out.printf("%-20s | %s%n", file.getName(),
                    FilenameUtils.getExtension(file.getName()));
        }
        System.out.println("");
    }
}

The result of the code snippet:

Name                 | Ext
--------------------------------
README               | 
lipsum.doc           | doc
lipsum.docx          | docx
data.html            | html
contributors.txt     | txt
pom.xml              | xml

Name                 | Ext
--------------------------------
pom.xml              | xml
contributors.txt     | txt
data.html            | html
lipsum.docx          | docx
lipsum.doc           | doc
README               | 

Maven Dependencies

<dependency>
    <groupId>commons-io</groupId>
    <artifactId>commons-io</artifactId>
    <version>2.5</version>
</dependency>