How do I write JSON string using JSON-Java (org.json) library?

The following code snippet show you how to create JSON string using JSON-Java library. Create an instance of JSONObject and use the put() method to create a key-value pair for the JSON string. The JSONArray object can be used to create an array of list of values to the JSON string, we also use the put() method to add value to the list.

The JSONObject.toString() method accept parameter called indentFactor, this set the indentation level of the generated string, which also make the JSON string generated easier to read and look prettier.

package org.kodejava.example.json;

import org.json.JSONArray;
import org.json.JSONObject;

public class WriteJSONString {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        JSONObject object = new JSONObject();
        object.put("id", 1L);
        object.put("name", "Alice");
        object.put("age", 20);

        JSONArray courses = new JSONArray();
        courses.put("Engineering");
        courses.put("Finance");
        courses.put("Chemistry");

        object.put("courses", courses);

        String jsonString = object.toString(2);
        System.out.println(jsonString);
    }
}

The result of the code snippet above is:

{
  "courses": [
    "Engineering",
    "Finance",
    "Chemistry"
  ],
  "name": "Alice",
  "id": 1,
  "age": 20
}

Maven Dependencies

<!-- https://repo1.maven.org/maven2/org/json/json/20180813/json-20180813.jar -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>org.json</groupId>
    <artifactId>json</artifactId>
    <version>20180813</version>
</dependency>

How do I read JSON file using JSON-Java (org.json) library?

In this example we are going to use the JSON-Java (org.json) library to read or parse JSON file. First we start by getting the InputStream of the JSON file to be read using getResourceAsStream() method. Next we construct a JSONTokener from the input stream and create an instance of JSONObject to read the JSON entries.

We can use method like getString(), getInt(), getLong(), etc to read a key-value from the JSON file. The getJSONArray() method allow us to read an list of values returned in JSONArray object. Which can be iterated to get each values represented by the key. Let’s see the detail code snippet below.

package org.kodejava.example.json;

import org.json.JSONArray;
import org.json.JSONObject;
import org.json.JSONTokener;

import java.io.InputStream;

public class ReadJSONString {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // info.json
        // {
        //  "id": "1",
        //  "name": "Alice",
        //  "age": "20",
        //  "courses": [
        //    "Engineering",
        //    "Finance",
        //    "Chemistry"
        //  ]
        //}
        String resourceName = "/info.json";
        InputStream is = ReadJSONString.class.getResourceAsStream(resourceName);
        if (is == null) {
            throw new NullPointerException("Cannot find resource file " + resourceName);
        }

        JSONTokener tokener = new JSONTokener(is);
        JSONObject object = new JSONObject(tokener);
        System.out.println("Id  : " + object.getLong("id"));
        System.out.println("Name: " + object.getString("name"));
        System.out.println("Age : " + object.getInt("age"));

        System.out.println("Courses: ");
        JSONArray courses = object.getJSONArray("courses");
        for (int i = 0; i < courses.length(); i++) {
            System.out.println("  - " + courses.get(i));
        }
    }
}

The result of the code snippet above is:

Id  : 1
Name: Alice
Age : 20
Courses: 
  - Engineering
  - Finance
  - Chemistry

Maven Dependencies

<!-- https://repo1.maven.org/maven2/org/json/json/20180813/json-20180813.jar -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>org.json</groupId>
    <artifactId>json</artifactId>
    <version>20180813</version>
</dependency>

How to pretty print JSON string using Jackson?

The following example demonstrates how to pretty print the JSON string produces by Jackson library. To produce well formatted JSON string we create the ObjectMapper instance and enable the SerializationFeature.INDENT_OUTPUT feature. To enable this feature we need to call the enable() method of the ObjectMapper and provide the feature to be enabled.

ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper().enable(SerializationFeature.INDENT_OUTPUT);
String json = mapper.writeValueAsString(recording);
System.out.println(json);

On the second example below we format unformatted JSON string. To do this we use the ObjectMapper‘s readValue(String, Class<T>) method which accept the JSON string and Object.class as the value type. The readValue() method return an Object. To format the JSON object we call mapper.writerWithDefaultPrettyPrinter().writeValueAsString(Object). This will produce a pretty formatted JSON.

ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
Object jsonObject = mapper.readValue(json, Object.class);
String prettyJson = mapper.writerWithDefaultPrettyPrinter().writeValueAsString(jsonObject);
System.out.println(prettyJson);

Below is the complete code snippets.

package org.kodejava.example.jackson;

import com.fasterxml.jackson.core.JsonProcessingException;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.ObjectMapper;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.SerializationFeature;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.time.LocalDate;
import java.time.Month;

public class JsonIndentOutput {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        JsonIndentOutput.formatObjectToJsonString();
        JsonIndentOutput.formatJsonString();
    }

    private static void formatObjectToJsonString() {
        Recording recording = new Recording();
        recording.setId(1L);
        recording.setTitle("Yellow Submarine");
        recording.setReleaseDate(LocalDate.of(1969, Month.JANUARY, 17));
        recording.setArtist(new Artist(1L, "The Beatles"));
        recording.setLabel(new Label(1L, "Apple"));

        ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper().enable(SerializationFeature.INDENT_OUTPUT);
        try {
            String json = mapper.writeValueAsString(recording);
            System.out.println(json);
        } catch (JsonProcessingException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    private static void formatJsonString() {
        String json = "{\"id\":1,\"title\":\"Yellow Submarine\",\"releaseDate\":\"1969-01-17\",\"artist\":{\"id\":1,\"name\":\"The Beatles\"},\"label\":{\"id\":1,\"name\":\"Apple\"}}";
        ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
        try {
            Object jsonObject = mapper.readValue(json, Object.class);
            String prettyJson = mapper.writerWithDefaultPrettyPrinter().writeValueAsString(jsonObject);
            System.out.println(prettyJson);
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

The code snippet above will pretty print the following JSON string:

{
  "id" : 1,
  "title" : "Yellow Submarine",
  "releaseDate" : "1969-01-17",
  "artist" : {
    "id" : 1,
    "name" : "The Beatles"
  },
  "label" : {
    "id" : 1,
    "name" : "Apple"
  }
}

Here are the structure of Recording class.

package org.kodejava.example.jackson;

import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.annotation.JsonDeserialize;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.annotation.JsonSerialize;

import java.time.LocalDate;
import java.util.Objects;

public class Recording {
    private Long id;
    private String title;

    @JsonDeserialize(using = LocalDateDeserializer.class)
    @JsonSerialize(using = LocalDateSerializer.class)
    private LocalDate releaseDate;

    private Artist artist;
    private Label label;

    public Recording() {
    }

    public Recording(Long id, String title, LocalDate releaseDate) {
        this.id = id;
        this.title = title;
        this.releaseDate = releaseDate;
    }

    // Getters and Setters
}

Maven Dependencies

<!-- http://repo1.maven.org/maven2/com/fasterxml/jackson/core/jackson-databind/2.8.6/jackson-databind-2.8.6.jar -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>com.fasterxml.jackson.core</groupId>
    <artifactId>jackson-databind</artifactId>
    <version>2.8.6</version>
</dependency>

How to format LocalDate object using Jackson?

We have a Recording class which has a Java 8 java.time.LocalDate property. We need to deserialize and serialize this property from and to JSON string. To do this we can use the @JsonDeserialize and @JsonSerialize annotations to annotate the LocalDate property of the Recording class.

@JsonDeserialize(using = LocalDateDeserializer.class)
@JsonSerialize(using = LocalDateSerializer.class)
private LocalDate releaseDate;

To use the annotation we need to create a class to deserialize and serialize the value. To create a deserializer class we create a class that extends StdDeserializer. The serializer class extends the StdSerializer class. Below is the definition of the LocalDateSerializer and LocalDateDeserializer class.

package org.kodejava.example.jackson;

import com.fasterxml.jackson.core.JsonGenerator;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.SerializerProvider;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.ser.std.StdSerializer;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.time.LocalDate;
import java.time.format.DateTimeFormatter;

public class LocalDateSerializer extends StdSerializer<LocalDate> {

    public LocalDateSerializer() {
        super(LocalDate.class);
    }

    @Override
    public void serialize(LocalDate value, JsonGenerator generator, SerializerProvider provider) throws IOException {
        generator.writeString(value.format(DateTimeFormatter.ISO_LOCAL_DATE));
    }
}
package org.kodejava.example.jackson;

import com.fasterxml.jackson.core.JsonParser;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.DeserializationContext;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.deser.std.StdDeserializer;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.time.LocalDate;

public class LocalDateDeserializer extends StdDeserializer<LocalDate> {

    protected LocalDateDeserializer() {
        super(LocalDate.class);
    }

    @Override
    public LocalDate deserialize(JsonParser parser, DeserializationContext context) throws IOException {
        return LocalDate.parse(parser.readValueAs(String.class));
    }
}

Let’s create a simple class that convert Recording object into JSON string and apply the date formatter defined in the LocalDateSerializer class.

package org.kodejava.example.jackson;

import com.fasterxml.jackson.core.JsonProcessingException;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.ObjectMapper;

import java.time.LocalDate;
import java.time.Month;

public class RecordingToJson {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Recording recording = new Recording();
        recording.setId(1L);
        recording.setTitle("Twist and Shout");
        recording.setReleaseDate(LocalDate.of(1964, Month.FEBRUARY, 3));

        ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
        try {
            String json = mapper.writeValueAsString(recording);
            System.out.println("JSON = " + json);
        } catch (JsonProcessingException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

    }
}

The output of the code snippet above is:

JSON = {"id":1,"title":"Twist and Shout","releaseDate":"1964-02-03","artist":null,"label":null}

And here is the complete definition of the Recording class.

package org.kodejava.example.jackson;

import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.annotation.JsonDeserialize;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.annotation.JsonSerialize;

import java.time.LocalDate;
import java.util.Objects;

public class Recording {
    private Long id;
    private String title;

    @JsonDeserialize(using = LocalDateDeserializer.class)
    @JsonSerialize(using = LocalDateSerializer.class)
    private LocalDate releaseDate;

    private Artist artist;
    private Label label;

    public Recording() {
    }

    public Recording(Long id, String title, LocalDate releaseDate) {
        this.id = id;
        this.title = title;
        this.releaseDate = releaseDate;
    }

    // Getters and Setters
}

Maven Dependencies

<!-- http://repo1.maven.org/maven2/com/fasterxml/jackson/core/jackson-databind/2.8.6/jackson-databind-2.8.6.jar -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>com.fasterxml.jackson.core</groupId>
    <artifactId>jackson-databind</artifactId>
    <version>2.8.6</version>
</dependency>

How to read and write Java object to JSON file?

The following example demonstrate how to serialize and deserialize Java object to JSON file. The Jackson’s ObjectMapper class provides writeValue(File, Object) and readValue(File, Class<T>) methods which allow us to write an object into JSON file and read JSON file into an object respectively.

package org.kodejava.example.jackson;

import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.ObjectMapper;

import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;

public class ObjectToJsonFile {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Artist artist = new Artist();
        artist.setId(1L);
        artist.setName("The Beatles");

        ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();

        File file = new File("artist.json");
        try {
            // Serialize Java object info JSON file.
            mapper.writeValue(file, artist);
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

        try {
            // Deserialize JSON file into Java object.
            Artist newArtist = mapper.readValue(file, Artist.class);
            System.out.println("newArtist.getId() = " + newArtist.getId());
            System.out.println("newArtist.getName() = " + newArtist.getName());
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

The result of the code snippet are:

newArtist.getId() = 1
newArtist.getName() = The Beatles

Maven Dependencies

<!-- http://repo1.maven.org/maven2/com/fasterxml/jackson/core/jackson-databind/2.8.6/jackson-databind-2.8.6.jar -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>com.fasterxml.jackson.core</groupId>
    <artifactId>jackson-databind</artifactId>
    <version>2.8.6</version>
</dependency>

How to convert JSON string to Java object?

In the following example we will convert JSON string to Java object using ObjectMapper class from the Jackson library. This class provides a method readValue(String, Class<T>) which will deserialize a JSON string into Java object. The first argument to the method is the JSON string and the second parameter is the result type of the conversion.

package org.kodejava.example.jackson;

import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.ObjectMapper;

import java.io.IOException;

public class JsonToObject {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String json = "{\"id\": 1, \"name\": \"The Beatles\"}";

        ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
        try {
            Artist artist = mapper.readValue(json, Artist.class);
            System.out.println("Artist = " + artist);

            System.out.println("artist.getId() = " + artist.getId());
            System.out.println("artist.getName() = " + artist.getName());
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

The code snippet above will print to following output:

Artist = Artist{id=1, name='The Beatles'}
artist.getId() = 1
artist.getName() = The Beatles

Maven Dependencies

<!-- http://repo1.maven.org/maven2/com/fasterxml/jackson/core/jackson-databind/2.8.6/jackson-databind-2.8.6.jar -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>com.fasterxml.jackson.core</groupId>
    <artifactId>jackson-databind</artifactId>
    <version>2.8.6</version>
</dependency>

How to convert Java object to JSON string?

The following example shows how to convert Java object into JSON string using Jackson. Jackson provide ObjectMapper class provides functionality to read and write JSON data. The writeValueAsString(Object) method to serialize any Java object into string.

package org.kodejava.example.jackson;

import com.fasterxml.jackson.core.JsonProcessingException;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.ObjectMapper;

public class ObjectToJson {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Artist artist = new Artist();
        artist.setId(1L);
        artist.setName("The Beatles");

        ObjectMapper mapper = new ObjectMapper();
        try {
            String json = mapper.writeValueAsString(artist);
            System.out.println("JSON = " + json);
        } catch (JsonProcessingException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

Running the code snippet above will print out the following result:

JSON = {"id":1,"name":"The Beatles"}

The structure of Artist class.

package org.kodejava.example.jackson;

public class Artist {
    private Long id;
    private String name;

    public Artist() {
    }

    public Artist(Long id, String name) {
        this.id = id;
        this.name = name;
    }

    // Getters & Setters
}

Maven Dependencies

<!-- http://repo1.maven.org/maven2/com/fasterxml/jackson/core/jackson-core/2.8.6/jackson-core-2.8.6.jar -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>com.fasterxml.jackson.core</groupId>
    <artifactId>jackson-core</artifactId>
    <version>2.8.6</version>
</dependency>
<!-- http://repo1.maven.org/maven2/com/fasterxml/jackson/core/jackson-annotations/2.8.6/jackson-annotations-2.8.6.jar -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>com.fasterxml.jackson.core</groupId>
    <artifactId>jackson-annotations</artifactId>
    <version>2.8.6</version>
</dependency>
<!-- http://repo1.maven.org/maven2/com/fasterxml/jackson/core/jackson-databind/2.8.6/jackson-databind-2.8.6.jar -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>com.fasterxml.jackson.core</groupId>
    <artifactId>jackson-databind</artifactId>
    <version>2.8.6</version>
</dependency>

How do I insert a document into MongoDB collection?

In the last MongoDB example, How documents are represented in MongoDB Java Driver?, we’ve seen how MongoDB JSON documents are represented in MongoDB Java driver.

Using this knowledge it is time for us to learn how to insert documents into MongoDB collections. We will create a code snippet that will insert documents into the teachers collections in the school database. We will see the complete code snippet first followed by a detail description of the code snippet. So, let’s begin with the code snippet.

package org.kodejava.example.mongodb;

import com.mongodb.*;

import java.net.UnknownHostException;
import java.util.Arrays;

public class MongoDBInsertDocument {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws UnknownHostException {
        // Creates MongoDB client instance.
        MongoClient client = new MongoClient(
                new ServerAddress("localhost", 27017));

        // Gets the school database from the MongoDB instance.
        DB database = client.getDB("schools");

        // Gets the teachers collection from the database.
        DBCollection collection = database.getCollection("teachers");
        collection.drop();

        // Creates a document to be stored in the teachers collections.
        DBObject document = new BasicDBObject("firstName", "John")
                .append("lastName", "Doe")
                .append("subject", "Computer Science")
                .append("languages", Arrays.asList("Java", "C", "C++"))
                .append("email", "john.doe@school.com")
                .append("address",
                        new BasicDBObject("street", "Main Apple St. 12")
                                .append("city", "New York")
                                .append("country", "USA"));

        // Prints the value of the document.
        System.out.println("document = " + document);

        // Inserts the document into the collection in the database.
        collection.insert(document);

        // Prints the value of the document after inserted in the collection.
        System.out.println("document = " + document);
    }
}

The snippet should be easy to understand. But I will explain about it a little bit more down here. In the beginning of the code snippet we begin with the following lines:

public static void main(String[] args) throws UnknownHostException {           
    // Creates MongoDB client instance.
    MongoClient client = new MongoClient(
        new ServerAddress("localhost", 27017));
}

This is how we bootstrap / start the MongoDB Java Driver. It connects to MongoDB server at localhost port 27017. If you omit using this ServerAddress class it will also connect to localhost port 27017 as the default. We also need to add the throws UnknownHostException to the main method signature because creating a MongoClient might throw this exception when the server is not available. Or you could wrapped the code inside a try-catch block instead. On the next lines you can see the following codes.

// Gets the school database from the MongoDB instance.
DB database = client.getDB("schools");

// Gets the teachers collection from the database.
DBCollection collection = database.getCollection("teachers");
collection.drop();

This code snippet tells you how to get the database, the school database. We get the database using the client.getDB() method call and passing the database name as the argument. The reference to this database then stored in a variable called database. After having the database we can then access the teachers collections by calling the database.getCollection() method.

You also notice that we call collection.drop(), which will clear the collection. We use this for our example purpose only, just to make sure that every time we execute our code snippet the collection will be cleaned before we insert some document.

Next, we creates the document to be stored in the teachers collections. We define a variable called document with DBObject type which refer the an instance of BasicDBObject type. And we add some fields in the document, and array type field and another embedded document.

// Creates a document to be stored in the teachers collections.
DBObject document = new BasicDBObject("firstName", "John")
        .append("lastName", "Doe")
        .append("subject", "Computer Science")
        .append("languages", Arrays.asList("Java", "C", "C++"))
        .append("email", "john.doe@school.com")
        .append("address",
                new BasicDBObject("street", "Main Apple St. 12")
                        .append("city", "New York")
                        .append("country", "USA"));

In the last three lines we do the following:

// Prints the value of the document.
System.out.println("document = " + document);

// Inserts the document into the collection in the database.
collection.insert(document);

// Prints the value of the document after inserted in the collection.
System.out.println("document = " + document);

In the first print out we will see the document as defined in the previous lines using the BasicDBObject with all the defined field values. Then it followed by calling the collection.insert() method which will insert the document into the collections.

In the last line we print out the document once again. You might see that the result is almost the same as the first print out, but you will notice that after inserted into the collection the document now have another field, which is the _id field assigned by the Java Driver as the object id of the document. The _id is added automatically if we didn’t define the _id field in the document. It is essentially the same as if we define the document using the following code, where _id it a type of org.bson.types.ObjectId.

DBObject document = new BasicDBObject("_id", new ObjectId());

And these are the actual output of the code above:

document = { 
    "firstName" : "John" , 
    "lastName" : "Doe" , 
    "subject" : "Computer Science" , 
    "languages" : [ "Java" , "C" , "C++"] , 
    "email" : "john.doe@school.com" , 
    "address" : { 
        "street" : "Main Apple St. 12" , 
        "city" : "New York" , 
        "country" : "USA"
    }
}

document = { 
    "firstName" : "John" , 
    "lastName" : "Doe" , 
    "subject" : "Computer Science" , 
    "languages" : [ "Java" , "C" , "C++"] , 
    "email" : "john.doe@school.com" , 
    "address" : { 
        "street" : "Main Apple St. 12" , 
        "city" : "New York" , 
        "country" : "USA"
    },
    "_id" : { "$oid" : "5408744803649d9155a296b7" }
}

How documents are represented in MongoDB Java Driver?

MongoDB documents are stored inside a collections as a JSON (JavaScript Object Notation) document. It’s a string of key-value pairs data. JSON is a lightweight data-interchange format. It is easy for humans to read and write. It is easy for machines to parse and generate.

When we are working in the MongoDB shell we can type in this document as a string that follow JSON data format. But how do we create this JSON document when working within a Java programming. This blog post will show you how to represent a document using Java Driver for MongoDB.

If you recall a key-value pairs data type you will remember that Java have a java.util.Map that can represent data structure in this format. So you might think that you can use a generic type of Map<String, Object> to store this data. But, because in MongoDB’s document the order of keys in a document is quite important to make sure the operations such as find, insert, update and remove work correctly, using a Map to represent a document can be quite dangerous.

MongoDB has a special interface called as com.mongodb.DBObject and its implementation class in com.mongodb.BasicDBObject that can be use to create or represent a document in MongoDB database. The DBObject is actually a map like structure with a key-value pairs. If you look up to the class hierarchy you can actually see that a BasicDBObject is inherited from the java.util.LinkedHashMap class.

The code snippet below will show you how to create a BasicDBObject to represent a MongoDB document.

package org.kodejava.example.mongodb;

import com.mongodb.BasicDBObject;
import com.mongodb.DBObject;

import java.util.Arrays;

public class MongoDBDocument {
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        // Creates an empty document.
        DBObject emptyDoc = new BasicDBObject();
        System.out.println("emptyDoc = " + emptyDoc);

        // Creates a simple document with a given key and value.
        DBObject simpleDoc = new BasicDBObject("name", "John Doe");
        System.out.println("simpleDoc = " + simpleDoc);

        // Creates a document with embedded document and arrays.
        DBObject document = new BasicDBObject("firstName", "Foo")
                .append("lastName", "Bar")
                .append("age", 25)
                .append("email", "foo@bar.com")
                .append("address",
                        new BasicDBObject("street", "Sunset Boulevard 123")
                                .append("city", "New York")
                                .append("country", "USA"))
                .append("hobbies", Arrays.asList("Swimming", "Cycling", "Running"));
        System.out.println("document = " + document);
    }
}

In the code above we have create three documents as an example. The first one is an empty document which created by instantiating a BasicDBObject class with no arguments specified. The second one we create a document with a single key and value. This key and value is passed as an argument when we create the BasicDBObject.

The last example show you how to create a document with multiple keys, embedded document and an arrays. To add more fields to the BasicDBObject we can call a chain of the append() method with a specified key and value. The key will be a string and the value is a type of java.lang.Object.

An embedded document is created simply by instantiating another BasicDBObject and assign it as a value of a document key. In the example above the address field is an embedded document inside the document. Which contains another fields such as street, city and country.

If you want to see how the JSON string of this document is look like you can run the code above. You will see something like the output below as the result.

emptyDoc = { }

simpleDoc = { "name" : "John Doe" }

document = { 
    "firstName" : "Foo" , 
    "lastName" : "Bar" , 
    "age" : 25 , 
    "email" : "foo@bar.com" , 
    "address" : { 
        "street" : "Sunset Boulevard 123" , 
        "city" : "New York"
    } , 
    "hobbies" : [ "Swimming" , "Cycling" , "Running"]
}

That’s the basic that you need to know on how to create a document using MongoDB Java Driver. You will use this document when doing some database operation in MongoDB such as finding a document, inserting, updating and removing document from collection in the database.

How do I convert Map into JSON?

This example show you how to convert a java.util.Map into JSON string and back to Map again.

package org.kodejava.example.google.gson;

import com.google.gson.Gson;
import com.google.gson.reflect.TypeToken;

import java.lang.reflect.Type;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

public class MapToJson {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Map<String, String> colours = new HashMap<>();
        colours.put("BLACK", "#000000");
        colours.put("RED", "#FF0000");
        colours.put("GREEN", "#008000");
        colours.put("BLUE", "#0000FF");
        colours.put("YELLOW", "#FFFF00");
        colours.put("WHITE", "#FFFFFF");

        // Convert a Map into JSON string.
        Gson gson = new Gson();
        String json = gson.toJson(colours);
        System.out.println("json = " + json);

        // Convert JSON string back to Map.
        Type type = new TypeToken<Map<String, String>>(){}.getType();
        Map<String, String> map = gson.fromJson(json, type);
        for (String key : map.keySet()) {
            System.out.println("map.get = " + map.get(key));
        }
    }
}

Here is the result of the program:

json = {"RED":"#FF0000","WHITE":"#FFFFFF","BLUE":"#0000FF","BLACK":"#000000","YELLOW":"#FFFF00","GREEN":"#008000"}
map.get = #FF0000
map.get = #FFFFFF
map.get = #0000FF
map.get = #000000
map.get = #FFFF00
map.get = #008000

Maven Dependencies

<!-- http://repo1.maven.org/maven2/com/google/code/gson/gson/2.8.0/gson-2.8.0.jar -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>com.google.code.gson</groupId>
    <artifactId>gson</artifactId>
    <version>2.8.0</version>
</dependency>