How to recursively rename files with a specific suffix in Java?

The following code snippet show you how to recursively rename files with a specific suffix. In this example we are renaming a collection of resource bundles files which ends with _in.properties into _id.properties. The code snippet also count the number of files affected by the process. We use the Files.move() method to rename the file, if you want to copy the files instead of renaming them, then you can use the Files.copy() method.

Here is the complete code snippet:

package org.kodejava.io;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.nio.file.Files;
import java.nio.file.Path;
import java.nio.file.Paths;
import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicInteger;
import java.util.stream.Stream;

public class RenameResourceBundles {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String startDirectory = "C:/Projects/Hello";
        AtomicInteger counter = new AtomicInteger(0);

        try (Stream<Path> paths = Files.walk(Paths.get(startDirectory))) {
            paths.filter(Files::isRegularFile)
                    .filter(path -> path.toString().endsWith("_in.properties"))
                    .forEach(path -> renameFile(path, counter));
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

        System.out.println("Total files renamed: " + counter.get());
    }

    private static void renameFile(Path path, AtomicInteger counter) {
        try {
            String newName = path.toString().replace("_in.properties", "_id.properties");
            Path newPath = Paths.get(newName);
            Files.move(path, newPath);
            System.out.println("Renamed: " + path + " to " + newPath);
            counter.incrementAndGet();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            System.out.println("Failed to rename: " + path);
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

This code will recursively search through all subdirectories starting from the specified root directory and rename any files that end with _in.properties to _id.properties. The process prints the renamed file, and finally outputs the total number of files that were successfully renamed after traversing the directory tree.

The explanation of the code snippet above:

  • The Files.walk method is used to traverse the directory tree starting from the given directory.
  • The filter method is used to select only regular files that end with _in.properties.
  • The renameFile method handles the renaming of each file, replacing _in.properties with _id.properties.
  • An AtomicInteger named counter keeps track of the number of files renamed. AtomicInteger is used to handle the count in a thread-safe manner, which is useful if the code is ever modified to use parallel streams or multi-threading.
  • Inside the renameFile method, counter.incrementAndGet() is called each time a file is successfully renamed. This increments the counter by one.
  • After the Files.walk operation, the total number of renamed files is printed using System.out.println("Total files renamed: " + counter.get());.

How do I read a file line by line using Java NIO?

The java.nio.file.Files.lines() method is a Java NIO method used to read the contents of a file line by line. The code snippet will read the file from the specified filePath and print each line to the console. The Files.lines() method returns a Stream of strings, and we use Stream’s forEach method to print each line.

Note that we are using a try-with-resources statement which will automatically close the stream after we are done with it, it’s a good practice to always close streams to free-up system resources.

Here’s a basic example of how you can use it.

package org.kodejava.io;

import java.nio.file.Files;
import java.nio.file.Paths;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.stream.Stream;

public class ReadFile {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // replace with your file path
        String filePath = "/Users/wayan/lipsum.txt";

        // read file into stream, try-with-resources
        try (Stream<String> stream = Files.lines(Paths.get(filePath))) {

            stream.map(String::trim)
                    .forEach(System.out::println);

        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

The Files.lines() method, along with other Java I/O and NIO methods, provide several important benefits and features:

  1. Memory Efficiency: This method reads the file line by line lazily, which means it doesn’t load the entire content of the file into memory. This is particularly useful when dealing with large files that could potentially exhaust system memory.
  2. Stream API Integration: The method returns a Stream<String>, it can naturally integrate with Java Stream API. This allows you to take advantage of powerful functions provided by Stream API such as filtering, mapping, reduction, etc., to process the file data effectively.
  3. Readability: Using Files.lines() with a try-with-resources construct results in more compact and readable code compared to older methods such as BufferedReader. The try-with-resources statement ensures that each resource is closed at the end of the statement, which can simplify cleanup code and avoid resource leaks.
  4. Exceptions Handling: I/O operations can generally throw IOException which are checked Exceptions in Java. Using Files.lines() within a try-with-resources statement ensures that any underlying resources are closed properly, even in the event of an Exception.
  5. Parallel Processing: Since Files.lines() method returns a Stream<String>, you can convert this stream into a parallel stream if you want to process the file with multithreading.

Remember, like with many programming choices, whether to use Files.lines() or another method depends on the specific needs and constraints of your project.

How do I read text file content line by line to a List of Strings using Commons IO?

The following example show how to use the Apache Commons IO library to read a text file line by line to a List of String. In the code snippet below we will read the contents of a file called sample.txt using FileUtils class. We use FileUtils.readLines() method to read the contents line by line and return the result as a List of Strings.

package org.kodejava.commons.io;

import org.apache.commons.io.FileUtils;

import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.List;

public class ReadFileToListSample {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // Create a file object of sample.txt
        File file = new File("README.md");

        try {
            List<String> contents = FileUtils.readLines(file, "UTF-8");

            // Iterate the result to print each line of the file.
            for (String line : contents) {
                System.out.println(line);
            }
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

Maven Dependencies

<dependency>
    <groupId>commons-io</groupId>
    <artifactId>commons-io</artifactId>
    <version>2.16.1</version>
</dependency>

Maven Central

How do I find files in a directory using DirectoryStream?

In this example we are going to learn to use the DirectoryStream, which part of java.nio.file package, to find files in a directory. We begin by creating a Path, the directory where the search will be conducted.

After that we create a DirectoryStream using Files.newDirectoryStream(). To create a directory stream we passed two arguments, the starting path and a glob expression. Below we use *.txt glob expression to filter all text files in the F:/Temp.

To get all the entries of the directory stream we can use a foreach loop as can be seen below. We iterate each entry, which is a Path object. And we print the entries file name using the getFileName() method.

package org.kodejava.io;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.nio.file.DirectoryStream;
import java.nio.file.Files;
import java.nio.file.Path;
import java.nio.file.Paths;

public class FindFilesInDirectory {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Path dir = Paths.get("F:/Temp");

        try (DirectoryStream<Path> stream = Files.newDirectoryStream(dir, "*.txt")) {
            for (Path entry : stream) {
                System.out.println(entry.getFileName());
            }
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

You can also notice that in this example we are using the try-with-resource statement. This mean that the DirectoryStream will be closed appropriately when the process is done. This type of try statement is an improvement introduced in JDK 7.

How do I create and delete a file in JDK 7?

In this example you’ll learn how to create and delete a file. Using the new Files class helper from the JDK 7 you can create a file using the Files.createFile(Path) method. To delete a file you can use the Files.delete(Path) method.

Before create a file and delete a file we can check to see if the file exists or not using the Files.exists(Path) method. In the code snippet below we’ll create a file when the file is not exist. And we’ll delete the file if the file exists.

package org.kodejava.io;

import java.nio.file.Files;
import java.nio.file.Path;
import java.nio.file.Paths;

public class CreateDeleteFile {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        try {
            // Create a config.cfg file under D:Temp directory.
            Path path = Paths.get("F:/Temp/config.cfg");
            if (!Files.exists(path)) {
                Files.createFile(path);
            }

            // Delete the path.cfg file specified by the Path.
            if (Files.exists(path)) {
                Files.delete(path);
            }
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}